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Question Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?

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1 year 8 months ago #2741 by Frenzy
Frenzy created the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
Hi guys,
Just bought my first Bongo and getting the timing belt changed by my local mechnic as well as a few ogher small jobs. He reckons the belt will be a big job and that he'll need to take the engine out to do it. Have searched the forum but nothing came up. Anyone any ideas or tips on making it easier...
Thanks!

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1 year 8 months ago #2742 by teenmal
teenmal replied the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
Aye you need to get another mechanic, for a qualified experience mechanic its no more than a hours work. Its been done in Twenty Minutes No Need to take the engine out, its obvious that the mechanic has not had a look at the job.

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1 year 8 months ago #2743 by Frenzy
Frenzy replied the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
Thanks.
Where is best to access it? From underneath, passenger seat or drivers seat?

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1 year 8 months ago #2744 by teenmal
teenmal replied the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
Remove the two trim panels just in front of the auto changer lever.

There is a cable/loom which runs from the passenger footwell across the engine
bay panel all the way to the handbrake. Undo all the electrical connectors and
retaining clips and gently fold the whole lot into the passenger footwell.
Undo the three 12mm bolts holding the auto changer lever. These are quite stiff
as they're threadlocked. You'll find the lever will just 'float' on the cable and can
be pushed side to side as access is required. This will reveal a 10mm bolt under
it.
Undo all the 10mm bolts around the edge of the panel. The panel can then be
'hinged' up on the handbrake cable and placed between the upturned seats out of
the way.
Undo the 10mm bolt holding the cable to the top of the cambelt cover. Next undo
the 10mm nut holding the wire to the glowplug rail. Follow this wire and you'll see
another wire which clips onto a temperature sender – unclip this as well. Fold
these over towards the passenger door and undo the plastic clip by the top of the
cambelt cover folowed by the 10mm nut which holds the loom a little further
down its length (near the alternator). It can then be folded back out of the way.
To the left of this, and restricting access to the cambelt cover is a metal bracket
sticking out of the bulkhead; it doesn't do anything on mine so I pushed/bent it in
out of the way. With access now available remove the 12mm bolt holding the
vertical steel pipe in front of the cambelt cover. Bolt is near the top of the pipe.
From the driver’s side, you now need to remove the corner of the air inlet pipe,
the bolt removed above went into the back of it. Undo the 10mm bolt/pipe clamp
holding the hose to its base. Remove the small pipe held by a spring clip and also
fold out of the way. Next undo the two 10mm bolts to the top, followed by the
12mm bolts which hold the corner piece to the rail itself. Carefully remove,
retaining the gaskets for reassembly later. The corner piece itself needs to be
moved around a bit to get it out of the hole.
Next remove the glowplug rail; this is held down with 7mm nuts. Next remove
the glowplugs: you'll need a deep 12mm socket wrench. Place these out of the
way in order so they can go back into the same holes.
Covers away
Remove the cambelt cover. There are six 10mm bolts in all. Remove the two
bolts you can see from the passenger side. Then remove the other four from the
driver’s side. You'll need to work the bottom one (nearest the driver’s footwell)
loose with a 10mm spanner, then undo it with fingers. The top from drivers side
holds the cable bracket, the next one down is also easy. The last difficult one is
the bottom bolt on the passenger side. This is still removed from the driver’s side
however. I used a deep socket, whilst pulling the vertical steel line towards me,
after having put the big rubber hose behind it first. You'll see what I mean...
The cover can now be removed. You can pull it out from the passenger side
straight up and out, though you'll probably need to lean over the engine and get
you right arm down to the bottom of the cover to pull it away from the block first.
At this point the vertical steel line and the big rubber hose will be conspiring
against you, gentle tweaks will release the cover though...




Line up the pulley
Next you need to line up the pulley marks. The cambelt is actually driven by the
fuel injector pump rather than the crankshaft; however you still need to turn the
crank to get everything in line. This is where the big tools come out (beg or
borrow time) – you'll need a 38mm socket wrench to turn the crank. This could
be turned by getting underneath, removing the undertray and using a big
adjustable, but this means jacking up: if you can get a six-face socket (i.e. with a
hexagon inside) it will be more inclined to stay on the nut too. Don't worry about
undoing the nut, with the glowplugs out it turns over nicely. So, with a mirror and
torch showing the face of the fuel injector pump pulley (this is the lower of the
two) you need to turn the crank until it's timing mark is in line with the arrow on
the block (from the driver’s side). If Lady Luck is with you, the marks on the
camshaft (top pulley) should also line up – I'd also use a mirror to check to avoid
parallax though. Always line the bottom pulley up perfectly; if due to slack the
top one is a little out, you can correct it later.
So with everything lined up, I'd recommend that you use paint to mark the old
belt, pulleys and block so that you can put everything back as it was. Right, now
undo the 14mm bolt from the center of the tensioner. Quite long, it also has a
washer on it. Now using needle-nose pliers, from the passenger side carefully
release the spring from its top peg. It should be held in position by the plastic 'U'
clip. Use your hands to completely remove the spring. Next remove the tensioner
from its pivot peg. The old belt can now be removed.
This is where I'd move the cam slightly if you need to with a 17mm spanner (if it
was out a few mm due to slack, with the bottom timing mark perfectly aligned).
Gently does it!
Belt and braces
Install the new belt, be advised here though to clean your hands first; oil and
grease from the previous removal can damage the new belt. Here you want to
avoid slack on the straight run side of the belt. Next install the tensioner onto its
peg. Loosely fit the tensioner retaining bolt, using threadlock. Next fit the spring.
To do this, I put the spring onto the tensioner with my left hand cupped from the
passenger side. I then pulled the spring onto the top peg using some welding wire
with a 'U' bent into the end, which I had been holding ready in my right hand.
Once in position I pushed the spring into its 'U' clip holder and carefully removed
the welding wire. I'd be tempted to wear goggles while dealing with the spring
and wire. Next, turn the crank two turns clockwise and make sure the marks
align. If they do not (it’s quite easy to be a 'tooth' out due to slack as you set it
up...) ensure that you line up the bottom mark, then release the tensioner and
turn the cam as required. Ensure that you re-test by another two turns of the
crank! You want this right first time. Tighten up the tensioner, make sure it
doesn't alter the tension from that applied by the spring.
Next, do the removal in reverse.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Distilled Waters Run Deep

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1 year 8 months ago #2745 by Frenzy
Frenzy replied the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
Thanks a lot mate!

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1 year 7 months ago #2772 by stuartb
stuartb replied the topic: Timing belt change on diesel- a big job?
We had ours done by a bongo specialist in Yorks and it was only 175, including Belt and tensioner. Barely worth the effort to try it yourself!

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